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A little trigonometry never hurt anyone
A little trigonometry never hurt anyone
M, white, twenty-what, slightly used and mostly confused

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wobbufetts:

aidn:

how the hell do i talk to people

Stand in front of them and press A




beatonna:

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.
Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.
-Kate

I am reblogging Ducks to send you the link to Todd Korol’s photo series on the Alberta oil sands.  It even comes with a scarecrow.  My sketches are very loose, and suggest things that are bigger, but it is something else to see them, and it is rare for me to see a set of images that evokes the place so clearly.  I think it is a good compliment to getting a bigger picture.  (Link)

beatonna:

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five

Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.

-Kate

I am reblogging Ducks to send you the link to Todd Korol’s photo series on the Alberta oil sands.  It even comes with a scarecrow.  My sketches are very loose, and suggest things that are bigger, but it is something else to see them, and it is rare for me to see a set of images that evokes the place so clearly.  I think it is a good compliment to getting a bigger picture.  (Link)




thelovelyseas:

Stingray by Ocean Frontiers Diving Adventures 




kenlayne:

"Strange tradition from the forgotten rural years." Bees attend keeper’s funeral, 1956.

kenlayne:

"Strange tradition from the forgotten rural years." Bees attend keeper’s funeral, 1956.




thecursedknight:

owlgoggles20:

Steal His Look: Smitty Werbenjaegermanjensen
Sorry but this look is currently unavailable
It was his hat, Mr. Krabs
He was #1

Oh god this has to be the best one yet

thecursedknight:

owlgoggles20:

Steal His Look: Smitty Werbenjaegermanjensen

Sorry but this look is currently unavailable

It was his hat, Mr. Krabs

He was #1

Oh god this has to be the best one yet




mrcheyl:

Wolfe Air Reel [x]

mrcheyl:

Wolfe Air Reel [x]




upwiththebirds42:

Happy birthday Annie Clark! 
(September 28, 1982)







notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl




no-youth:

i have an incredibly hard time believing the fact that the phrase “i will face god and walk backwards into hell” was created by dril and not taken from some 16th century literary epic